Suggestion: Hugo

It's Scorsese. But it's a kid's film. It's about a love of movies, but not from the point of view of a struggling artiste who no one understand and who is TORTURED but who will not be denied because one time in his childhood he had this unbelievable, yet character-forming--

Well, it's not that. It's a sweet modern-ish fairy tale about a poor kid making due with a bad lot - in GORgeous surroundings - finding friendship, chasing a dream, helping those around him find happiness.

I DID mention it was Scorsese, right? Yeah. Marty doin' PG. In 3D. If you saw the film in theatres, in 3D, WOW, right? What a treat. I have no idea if the DVD/Blu-Ray/streaming transfers can compare, but I still think this film has the best use of 3D in any film I've seen.

It's a really good movie, I think the consensus said. But is it truly great (Hint: Yes!)? Is it Canon-worthy? It's all about the love of movies. So it's really a perfect fit.

Please consider it.

ss7
ss7
3 posts
28 replies

@muthsarah To be honest, I barely remember the film. I paid my 5.99 to watch it in HD OnDemand once it hit the home market and all I remember was thinking it was neither a film for kids or a film for adults, stuck somewhere in Scorsese's nostalgia. Everything felt like it was in slow motion. Everything was so leisurely paced and deliberately presented that I was going insane waiting for the next plot development while the film was so self-importantly getting off on the most rudimentary cinema 101 relics. Chloe Grace Moretz has always felt like an actress who gave forced performances, and in this particular case, it was made worse by what felt like the director telling her to, "just slow down, slower... no really, slowly deliver this line and remember, this is super important, so be really wide-eyed in your enthusiasm". I hate to be so negative, but Scorsese usually delivers adult material, so seeing him get all sentimental came off as massively jarring in the way he tried to bridge the gap between cold-hearted material and a soft and special narrative... I hate GOODFELLAS, CASINO, GANGS OF NEW YORK and a bunch of his other films, to begin with, but this one really took the cake in relation to not working for me. I couldn't connect because besides the fantastic art direction and production values, nothing hit home. It all felt like a bunch of two-dimensional stock characters glossing over material I learned in the one film class I took in college. I'm glad the film worked for you, honestly, and I apologize for raining on your parade, so to speak, but HUGO just feels like a very pretentious misfire to me.

muthsarah
muthsarah
7 posts
115 replies

I fear to ask, but, what was it about the film you hated so much, SS7?

It IS a kids' film, I want to state. Based on a kids' book. Following child characters, from their points-of-view. That's how I approached it. So certain allowances are given for such a perspective.

I never saw a film remotely like this one growing up. I really was gobsmacked by it, though. Not just a beautiful film on technical merits, but also a film that wants to inform its audience about a long-LONG-begone day, yet, the dawning of the age of movies. If you love movies (as I did as a kid same as now), I suspect it would have made a POWERFUL impression.

But I was already arguably-kinda-old when I saw it. Still, I felt it was done skillfully enough that I forgave the occasional rough patch and saw/heard/felt Scorsese's (and maybe the author's too, I haven't actually read the source material) deep love for the subject. I do adore films based around obvious love coming from the filmmakers. I want to view moviemaking and movieviewing as an idealistic, positive act.

Short answer: I never had a film like this as a kid, and I (retroactively) wished so GAWDDAMM hard that I had. So "Hugo" ultimately left me with a very powerfully bittersweet feeling. I love bittersweet endings. This particular experience was very, very meta, though.

And so I still have strong feelings on the film. And, ultimately, love it as I have few films I saw first as an adult. The best (retroactive) kids' film I've ever seen. Maybe.

himartinson
himartinson
3 posts
189 replies

Put this in a versus episode with Beasts of the Southern Wild, because they're both about kids learning to find their own way, and taking over for fathers or father figures. That said, do you prefer the polished love letter to cinema, or do you pick the down and dirty fairy tale?

ss7
ss7
3 posts
28 replies

Man, I can't stand this film... Kind of glad it bankrupted everyone involved. It flopped harder than JOHN CARTER, but no one ran stories about it, since it was Scorsese.

Please sign up to join in on the conversation!

Register