The Canon 65 | 2/22/16
Election (w/ Paul Rust)
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Paul Rust of LOVE on Netflix joins Devin & Amy this week to nominate the Alexander Payne 1999 film Election into The Canon! The movie stars Matthew Broderick as Jim McAllister, a popular high school social studies teacher in suburban Omaha, Nebraska, and Reese Witherspoon as Tracy Flick, around the time of the school's student body election. When Tracy qualifies to run for class president, McAllister believes she does not deserve the title and tries his best to stop her from winning. Tune in to hear why Pau l believes this film should be in the canon -- and head to the forums on Wolfpop to cast the deciding vote!


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obonolivares
obonolivares
2 posts

I remember reading about this movie in Rolling Stone, but sadly it was never shown in cinemas here in Sweden. But luckily it was released in vhs and I fell in love with its characters, the script and the awesome choice of music (specially the main title from Navajo Joe). This was the movie that made me stop thinking of Ferris Bueller every time I saw Matthew Broderick. So, for me, it's a big YES, this movie should definitely be in The Canon!

mentalknight
mentalknight
1 posts

Haha "In your face, Scalia!" If this was recorded after his death, I applaud Devin and his balls. If not, a few people fucked up here.

j_blatto
j_blatto
25 posts

Paul Rust isn't an actor I immediately recognize but he was wildly entertaining in this episode and the Inglorious Basterds episode of I Was There Too. I'll check out Love this weekend.

Vote Yes for the Canon.

porkchop1
porkchop1
1 posts

I wonder if Devin was the only one who didn't get that Traci was poor because he is from New York where using public transportation is not stigmatized. In the Midwest, if you are old enough to drive a car, but take the bus, you are poor.

enda
enda
1 posts

Love this film! More than just the political parallels, I do think some of the film is focused more simply on the atmosphere of high school. There's a great scene when McAllister is interrogating Tracy over the torn posters. The tension is ratcheted up with increasing close up and then it cuts suddenly to a wide shot of this wonderfully bland small room and in doing so satirises the stakes of high school in general because none of it actually matters. Hopefully that makes sense.