The Canon 38 | 8/17/15
Reservoir Dogs
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Devin and Amy finally tackle a Quentin Tarantino film and which better than his debut: Reservoir Dogs. The story of a heist gone wrong with a cast of criminals with colors for nicknames formed the 90s with its profound impact the size of a meteor. Is this a no brainer entry into the canon or does a different Tarantino film deserve to be entered into the canon? Tune in to hear Devin & Amy discuss Tarantino’s craft of violence -- and head to the forums on Wolfpop to cast the deciding vote!

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JoeSchmoe
JoeSchmoe
3 posts

Definitely Canon.
It's amazing how shocking this movie was when it was initially released, with it's violence and language, where as now, we're getting far more extreme stuff on TV.

tylergfoster
tylergfoster
7 posts

I know it's bad form to post before listening to the episode, but I forgot to post about Mission Impossible, so I'm gonna do this while I'm here. For me, not Canon. It's the only Tarantino film that is, in my opinion, a bad movie. Tim Roth is great and his "joke" is a hint of what's to come for Tarantino, but the dialogue frequently sounds overwritten in the way his imitators often do (probably a direct result of them thinking this is his best movie!), especially via Madsen's smug performance. The scene where Nice Guy Eddie greets him in Joe's office is a summary of everything that's wrong here in that it's almost pointless, it isn't funny, and it winks at the viewer for ten million years. It's hard to believe the guy who made this made Pulp Fiction and Jackie Brown because those movies are so balanced in all of the areas that RD is not.

johngottschalk
johngottschalk
4 posts

My main problem with Tarantino's works from Kill Bill onwards, is they have a bunch of great scenes, they have a bunch of great characters, and a bunch of great lines, but I don't feel any other of his works is as consistently good from start to end than Reservoir Dogs.
Especially the shootouts at the end of Basterds and Django are just so self-absorbed and fetishised that they really turn me off of those movies.
For me, Reservoir Dogs is true to itself from start to finish, and it just works all the way through.

johngottschalk
johngottschalk
4 posts

I also don't feel every thing he's done is a departure.
You can break his oeuvre into 2 clear halves that hinge on the Kill Bill movies.
On one side you have experimentation with editing time on the other you have revenge flicks. Setting/genre changes per movie, but we know how he pulls from other creators and that explains those shifts.

madmeme
madmeme
3 posts

After listening to Devin wax fannosophically about Tarentino for over an hour, I feel compelled to point out the following: before him there was the Coen Bros. - to be precise, they had made "Blood Simple" (another excellent debut film), "Raising Arizona", "Miller's Crossing" (a more memorable and, IMO, Canon-worthy film than "Reservoir Dogs"), and "Barton Fink". I would argue that, not only have they had a greater impact on cinema than Tarentino (some might even posit that without them, there would be no Quentin or P.T.Anderson), but they have also produced more Canon-worthy work than him, with some of their recent films being some of their best work to date (unlike Q.T.). Just compare "Django Unchained" to "Inside LLewyn Davis" - they aren't in the same league in terms of mature later work. If any American director is worthy of that hypothetical 5th best director of the last 100 years, it's Joel and Ethan Coen.